Understand the basics of concussions.

Concussions can happen in any sport or activity. Knowing the basics will help coaches, officials, and parents more easily identify this type of brain injury.

Concussions 101, a Primer for Kids and Parents

The symptoms of a concussion can be tough for kids to recognize. Dr. Mike Evans is founder of the Health Design Lab at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, an Associate Professor of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of Toronto, and a staff physician at St. Michael’s Hospital.

What is a concussion?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury—or TBI—caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. This sudden movement can cause the brain to bounce around or twist in the skull, stretching and damaging the brain cells and creating chemical changes in the brain.

 

Signs and Symptoms of a Concussion

Children and teens who show or report one or more of the signs and symptoms listed below, or simply say they just “don’t feel right” after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body, may have a concussion or more serious brain injury.
Concussion Signs Observed
  • Can’t recall events prior to or after a hit or fall
  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Forgets an instruction, is confused about an assignment or position, or is unsure of the game, score, or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  • Shows mood, behavior, or personality changes
Concussion Symptoms Reported
  • Headache or “pressure” in head
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems or dizziness, or double or blurry vision
  • Bothered by light or noise
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  • Confusion, or concentration or memory problems
  • Just not “feeling right,” or “feeling down”

Signs and symptoms generally show up soon after the injury. However, you may not know how serious the injury is at first and some symptoms may not show up for hours or days. For example, in the first few minutes your child or teen might be a little confused or a bit dazed, but an hour later your child might not be able to remember how he or she got hurt.

You should continue to check for signs of concussion right after the injury and a few days after the injury. If your child or teen’s concussion signs or symptoms get worse, you should take him or her to the emergency department right away.

Concussion Danger Signs

In rare cases, a dangerous collection of blood (hematoma) may form on the brain after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body that may squeeze the brain against the skull. Call 9-1-1 right away, or take your child or teen to the emergency department if he or she has one or more of the following danger signs after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body:
Dangerous Signs & Symptoms of a Concussion
  • One pupil larger than the other
  • Drowsiness of inability to wake up
  • A headache that gets worse and does not go away
  • Slurred speech, weakness, numbness, or decreased coordination
  • Repeated vomiting or nausea, convulsions or seizures (shaking or twitching)
  • Unusual behavior, increased confusion, restlessness, or agitation
  • Loss of consciousness (passed out/knocked out) – Even a brief loss of consciousness should be taken seriously

Long-Term Effects

A person with a severe brain injury will need to be hospitalized and may have long-term problems affecting things such as:
  • Thinking
  • Memory
  • Learning
  • Coordination and balance
  • Speech, hearing or vision
  • Emotions

A severe brain injury can affect all aspects of people’s lives, including relationships with family and friends, as well as their ability to work or be employed, do household chores, drive, and/or do other normal daily activities.

Resources

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have put together a host of documents and resources for Parents, Coaches, Officials and Administrators. The CDC’s Heads Up program has valuable and numerous educational materials for your school or program, available for download as PDFs.
Explore the specific policies in your state regarding concussion protocol for high school athletes.

 

 

 

 

Do I have a Concussion?

This is a helpful tool to assist in tracking symptoms and communicating with the medical professionals managing post-concussion care.
First Week